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Ligne Roset: comfort makes luxury

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1860. Somewhere between Lyon and Geneva, a craftsman undertakes the production of chairs without suspecting thus laying the foundations for a brand that his heirs would have made famous. Five generations later, Ligne Roset represents timeless elegance, know-how and modernity. Meeting with one of the custodians of this heritage, Antoine Roset.

Posted yesterday at 12:00

Isabella Morin

Isabella Morin
The print

“A Ligne Roset chair or piece of furniture is increasingly made of wood and foam rubber”, insists the Roset house. This is what we see taking place in a Ploum model for this interview. Our sofa is clearly lacking in resources, we tell ourselves as we settle into the seat … A look at its price reminds us to order: Ligne Roset is a high-end brand. Our sofa has other advantages.

Quality and contemporaneity are part of the brand’s DNA, notes the founder’s great-great-grandson, adding this essential pillar: the family.


PHOTO ROBERT SKINNER, THE PRESS

Antoine Roset, marketing director of the French furniture house Ligne Roset

We try to stay really attached to the pure definition of the word design, which is to make an everyday object more beautiful and more interesting in its function.

Antoine Roset, Marketing Director of Ligne Roset

With 700 stores worldwide and 160 years after its inception, Ligne Roset is still run by the same clan that made it the largest publisher-producer-distributor of contemporary furniture in France. And it is still in the Ain department, where it all began, that the house makes its products with a know-how rooted in the French artisan heritage.

“It is the key to quality,” says Antoine Roset. It allows us to control everything we do from A to Z and to be free. In this way, we can push creativity further. A hundred designers from all over the world collaborate with the brand, which allows us to have a real richness in terms of design and to offer a mix of styles and shapes. ”

Reimagine the seat

After the war, Ligne Roset invested in Scandinavian furniture which was, at the time, the most contemporary. However, it was in the 1960s that his true identity was revealed. Jean Roset meets Michel Ducaroy, then fresh from Beaux-Arts in Lyon and gifted with a particularly modern vision of design. The designer came up with this idea that foam can contribute to the structure of a sofa and not just its comfort.

From this union come seats with distinct lines such as the Asana, which can be assembled to create different seating platforms, the Marsala, a plump armchair that you would never want to leave, or the Asana, all curved. Each one presents, in his own way, “another way of sitting”. Togo, released in 1973, pushes the concept further.

Goodbye firecracker, hello cigar!

“When he left, Togo was greeted coldly,” observes the brand’s marketing director, reporting his grandfather’s anecdotes. We said: “Your product is not finished. Something is missing! “” The feet, in particular. Yet this is what will explain part of his success three years later.


PHOTO ROBERT SKINNER, THE PRESS

Revolutionary for the time, the iconic Togo remains unchanged to this day. It still embodies a modernity that is inseparable from the brand image.

The advertising campaign of Togo adopts the slogan “Goodbye firecracker, hello cigar!” “, Which directly targets the sixty-eight. After making the revolution, this generation is gradually taking sides without wanting to do like its parents. Togo arrives with a vision of comfort and quality that is a far cry from traditional furniture. The idea pleases.

Roset’s personality

“I envision our client as an urban, open-minded person who loves culture in its broadest sense and who has traveled. He is young, not necessarily by age, but by vision of the world ”, reflects Antoine Roset, admitting that this portrait is quite close to his person.

The heir himself worked for 11 years in New York, first in the field of luxury watches, then for Ligne Roset, before settling in Lyon with his family four years ago. “I’m a bit like Obelix. It is true that I fell into it when I was little. The foam bales were my playground. ”

  • The Ploum is the result of research on comfort.  The designers R. & E. Boullerec have combined elastic material and super soft foam in this model.

    PHOTO SUPPLIED BY LIGNE ROSET

    The Ploum is the result of research on comfort. The designers R. & E. Boullerec have combined elastic material and super soft foam in this model.

  • The Ruché bed frame, by Inga Sempé, combines tradition and originality.

    PHOTO ROBERT SKINNER, THE PRESS

    The Ruché bed frame, by Inga Sempé, combines tradition and originality.

  • The Taru collection designed by the German designer Sebastian Herkner

    PHOTO ROBERT SKINNER, THE PRESS

    The Taru collection designed by the German designer Sebastian Herkner

  • Tellen, by Christian Werner, is inspired by the Japanese Zen garden.

    PHOTO SUPPLIED BY LIGNE ROSET

    Tellen, by Christian Werner, is inspired by the Japanese Zen garden.

  • The Ennea table is based on three identical triangles in solid wood.  It is signed by the designer Vincent Tordjman.

    PHOTO SUPPLIED BY LIGNE ROSET

    The Ennea table is based on three identical triangles in solid wood. It is signed by the designer Vincent Tordjman.

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“Our products are not accessible to everyone”, he agrees again, underlining that a Roset product is still a guarantee of longevity. “Togo passes from generation to generation. Some inherit a model that is over 40 years old. Inevitably, our customers have the means to purchase our products, but some also choose to save because they recognize their intrinsic qualities. ”

At a time when everything flows fast – including fashions – the maison is relying on other values. “Do we need the pink sofa we see everywhere on Instagram? No, if we like our blue sofa, the manager replies without waiting for an answer. We give personality! We buy a Ligne Roset for its contemporary signature, its comfort and its quality. Above all, we buy a Ligne Roset to keep it.

Antoine Roset in four questions

What does your interior design look like?

It is a mix of contemporary furnishings and Haussmannian classicism. My wife and I are also small art collectors.

Your definition of style?

It has to be something elegant, of quality and in which you feel good. Unfortunately, I think elegance has disappeared in our perception of comfort …

A “guilty” pleasure in decoration?

I love lamps and I have a small collection in the house. Light can change everything in a room. I give it a lot of attention.

What do you think is the biggest misstep in interior design?

Speed. You want it all, now! Furniture that has meaning and personality is built over time.

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