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Divine: Take your wine to the South Shore

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When chef Ian Perreault launched a “bring your own wine” restaurant along Highway 20 a year ago, he knew he should confuse some skeptics. Yes, such a restaurant can serve quality dishes, even outside the metropolis. Proof ? His three establishments are located in Sainte-Julie, including the most recent, the Divine, which opened this spring.

Posted at 11:00

Veronique Larocche

Veronique Larocche
The print

In this contemporary Italian restaurant, Ian Perreault and his accomplice, chef Jean-François Parrot, offer gourmet cuisine. “We use somewhat French techniques. Yes, there is the cream. Yes, there is tomato sauce. All products are homemade. “

On the menu there are eight appetizers, some meat and fish dishes and eight hearty fresh pasta dishes, including delicious fettuccine with mushrooms. “It became a classic pretty quickly,” says the chef.

  • Saint-Charlessur-Richelieu buffalo mozzarella, room tomatoes, 5-year-old balsamic vinegar, floral extra virgin olive oil, finely grated parmesan, fried shallot and micro basil

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, THE PRESS

    Saint-Charlessur-Richelieu buffalo mozzarella, room tomatoes, 5-year-old balsamic vinegar, floral extra virgin olive oil, finely grated parmesan, fried shallot and micro basil

  • AAA beef shoulder fillet carpaccio, light spice crust, sun-dried tomato emulsion, black olive crumble, organic rocket, beetroot powder, olive oil and pecorino flakes

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, THE PRESS

    AAA beef shoulder fillet carpaccio, light spice crust, sun-dried tomato emulsion, black olive crumble, organic rocket, beetroot powder, olive oil and pecorino flakes

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This dish, appreciated by customers, is also among those offered at low prices for the summer season on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Two starters and two main courses for just $ 40 – in these times of inflation, such a proposition is tempting. All that remains is to bring a drink. Even the best bottles go well with Divino’s dishes, assures Ian Perreault.

In addition to the Italian restaurant, he and Jean-François Parrot are behind Les Cuisiniers and Yamato, two places based at the same address. The first was born in June 2021. It offers charcoal meat and excellent tartare. The second is a Japanese bistro that has been around for 17 years and whose menu has recently been revamped.

  • The chefs Ian Perreault and Jean-François Parrot, in the decor of the Les Cuisiniers restaurant

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, THE PRESS

    The chefs Ian Perreault and Jean-François Parrot, in the decor of the Les Cuisiniers restaurant

  • Il Divino has 80 seats.

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, THE PRESS

    Il Divino has 80 seats.

  • The Divine and its neighbor, the Japanese bistro Yamato

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, THE PRESS

    The Divine and its neighbor, the Japanese bistro Yamato

  • Behind the Divino is the Les Cuisiniers restaurant and its terrace.

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, THE PRESS

    Behind the Divino is the Les Cuisiniers restaurant and its terrace.

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Consultant chef for ten years, Ian Perreault, who notably attended the opening of Chez Lionel, in Boucherville, in 2013, had promised himself that he would no longer be the owner of a restaurant. What prompted him to break his promise? “Mental illness, perhaps,” he replies jokingly.

In a more serious tone, he speaks of “business opportunity”, of “correct rent”, of “different concept”. The idea of ​​cooking quality food, but at a high volume, “excited her very much”. “I found the challenge interesting,” she concludes.

1970, rue Leonard-de-Vinci, Saint-Julie

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