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Dan Bigras will no longer be the spokesperson for the Refuge: “Anxiety does not diminish with age”

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It is literally like [quitter] a blonde you’re still madly in love with and haven’t had a fight withsummarized Dan Bigras explaining the reasons for his departure, motivated in large part by the reduction of his energies, his struggle with anxiety and his desire to have a beautiful old age.

It wasn’t the cancer, but rather the chemo that took some of my energy away. The accident – when a truck it crashed into my back and I was unprotected because I was on four wheels – it also knocked me out of energyexplained Thursday, in an interview with Catherine Richer, the show’s cultural columnist 15-18.

But also honestly, there’s also the fact that I’m 64. I really don’t have a choice, it comes into play. He went on to evoke his family history and genetics, not necessarily adapted to great stress.

The reason I take it very seriously is that my father died of heart failure at 57 and my grandfather at 50. But it’s not just the heart, it’s their emotions; they have not had a good old age. They had an extremely sad old age.

Anxiety does not decrease with age

Dan Bigras quickly admits that a personality other than his might not have reacted in the same way to the idea of ​​having to organize it Show Refuge or to be the spokesperson for the organization for a few more years. She says that, on his part, her worried nature and her closeness to the cause he was advocating made the task seem increasingly heavy to bear.

I know somewhere there was a motivation for finding my little brother in a ditch that pushed me there a bit. I’m not a cave, it doesn’t bring the dead back to life, but instead of being a crying, crazy person, I could be part of a gang that was part of a solution.He explained.

So I really got it [cet engagement à cœur], but always with the idea of ​​”if I have the wrong number the show doesn’t come back and the Refuge closes, it’s my fault”. I always have it on my shoulders.

He also wanted to make the difference between the transient anguish and the anxiety he claims to suffer from and which ultimately convinced him to let go.

Anguish, you have power over it; you can decide to react in a certain way, get angry or calm down. Anxiety is much more widespread and has much deeper ramifications within you, much more distant, too distant to remember, she said. You can do 50 psychoanalysis and there are always cases that will escape you.

The idea that we all become Buddhist monks is a joke. Anxiety does not decrease with age.

A quote from Dan Bigras
Nanette Workman and Dan Bigras sing into the microphone.

Nanette Workman and Dan Bigras perform a song during the Show du Refuge in 1994.

Photo: Radio-Canada

Live a good old age

The other big reason behind his departure, as Dan Bigras states, is the fact that he thinks he can reach a peaceful old age, unlike his father or grandfather. I live in the woods on the bank of a river; i can live in my studio and have a very pleasant lifeHe explained.

As he recalls his difficult childhood, he says that music and his various commitments allowed him to correct some things in his life. The cause that took up half of his life is still close to his heart. He states that he may remain a consultant for the Refuge des jeunes, but as he approaches his 65th birthday, he feels it is time for him to involve his body and soul in the organization.

I could have a good old age, it would be stupid to waste it and suddenly get sick from too much anxiety and too much pressure. I care and I think I have the right to think a little about myself.

One last Show Refuge October 13

Before retiring, Dan Bigras will hold the reins of a final Show Refuge, October 13. The charity event, which will be presented for the first time at TOHU, will be held in front of a limited audience, with only 500 tickets on sale (New window).

Dan Bigras will be accompanied by Ginette Reno, Isabelle Boulay, Marie-Nicole Lemieux, Guylaine Tanguay, Luce Dufault, Samian, Yama and Lulu Hughes.

I think this sympathy I have for the children it will stay for life, so it’s not over there. I will not only be a spokesperson for the Refuge and I will no longer organize shows, but I will keep the same emotionsconcluded the singer.

This text was written byan interview conducted by Catherine Richercultural columnist of the show 15-18. The comments may have been edited for clarity or conciseness.

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